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                                  San Ramon Carpet Cleaning Done Right! 

We at A Better Restorations San Ramon Carpet Cleaning division are proud to be serving the East Bay Area for over 25 years now. We are your San Ramon experts when it comes to carpet & upholstery cleaning. We clean carpets, rugs and mats according to high green cleaning standards, using only biodegradable materials which do not harm the environment or your health. You can relax knowing that your San Ramon Carpet Cleaning  is being done by A Better Restoration..

In addition to being the right San Ramon Carpet Cleaning and upholstery cleaning service providers we also tailor to numerous house cleaning needs. We clean tile and grout and use hot water extraction methods such as steam cleaning which are proven to be the most effective in removing tough stains from carpets and upholstery.

Call us today at (925)-829-7776 for local San Ramon Carpet Cleaning service and service throughout the East Bay Area.

San Ramon Carpet Cleaners only uses the latest carpet cleaning machines such as truck mount systems to provide you with the best results available. Our methods are proven to remove tough stains, such as dirt and oil from all fabrics and polyester synthetics without damaging their texture, color or softness. You can stop looking; we are A Better Restoration, your East Bay Area and San Ramon Carpet Cleaning experts.

     

       HOW TO KNOW WHEN YOUR CARPET NEEDS CLEANED

Professional San Ramon Carpet Cleaners find that lots of people have questions about San Ramon carpet cleaning. Let us clarify how often you might want to consider cleaning your carpet. The longest anyone wants to go between carpet cleanings is one year. Even if a carpet gets no traffic it is subject to dust and other environmental contaminants. You should clean the carpets in your home every year if you have only one or two people in your home with no pets and no smokers. If you meet these conditions, clean your carpets once a year. 

The next interval is once every nine months. Clean your carpets every nine months if you have children or pets, or if your household has one or two whom are smokers. Clean your carpets every six to nine months if you have kids, pets and/or smokers in the family. The combinations of these factors make more frequent carpet cleaning necessary.

Finally there is the three month interval. This is for homes that have pets, kids and smokers. If this is the case three months is recommended, as these factors are rough on the carpet and your home.

      

 Use these intervals as guidelines. Every home is different. You might be able to go longer between cleanings if you have a lot of hard surfaces in the home. 



You also might have to clean the carpet more often if you live in a dusty environment, or according to your preferences and standards. This should give you enough information to make a general decision about when to clean your carpets. A Better Restoration's Carpet Cleaning is always available via phone or form contact.


We offer professional, state-of-the-art San Ramon carpet cleaning services, whether it be for regular maintenance or after a disaster happens to hit your home (flood/water damage, fire/smoke damage, etc.). Our team of professional technicians can assess the situation, no matter how big or small, and make the carpet cleaning process as painless and convenient to you as we possibly can. 


                    So call our San Ramon Carpet Cleaning team a call and schedule that long-overdue carpet cleaning today.



     50 FACTS ABOUT San Ramon CARPET CLEANING AND PROFFESIONALSan Ramon CARPET CLEANERS

  1. The Norwalk virus or Norovirus (the virus that causes the stomach flu) can survive on an uncleaned carpet for a month or more.
  2. The term “carpet” derives from the Latin carpere, “to pluck,” probably because carpets were made from unraveled “plucked” fabric. “Carpet” has the same Latin root as carpe diem, literally “pluck/seize the day.”
  3. The oldest surviving carpet is the celebrated Pazyryk carpet, which is over 2,000 years old. It was found in the 1940s in a Scythian tomb in southern Siberia.
  4. Microbiologists have identified air blown from a running vacuum cleaner as one of the five places in the home that has the highest numbers of germs. Other places include dish sponges, washing machines, bathroom toilets during a flush, and kitchen trash cans.
  5. The term “carpet bagger” is a derogatory reference to Northerners who sought to take political and economic advantage of the South’s defeat after the Civil War. The name refers to the travel bag made from carpet that many Northerners used to carry their possessions. The swastika design has been traditionally a symbol of good fortune and can be found on carpets from America, Europe, India, and China


  1. The phrase “to sweep under the carpet” in its figurative sense was first recorded in 1963.
  2. Each year, several pounds of soil can accumulate in and under a carpet.
  3. The five-second rule is a myth: bacteria can live after four weeks on carpet. And, thanks to “microbial adhesion,” germs such as the following are immediately transferred to food: Salmonella typhimurium, Campylobacter, and Salmonella enteritis, a nasty bacterium that causes horrible diarrhea and vomiting.
  4. Bed bugs can live in carpet fibers and wooden floorboards. For their size, they are extremely fast and can crawl more than 100 feet to obtain a blood meal, usually at night from people who are sleeping. Engorgement takes about three to 10 minutes yet people rarely realize they are being bitten.
  5. A person sheds about 1.5 million skin flakes an hour, most of which becomes embedded in our carpets.
  6. Scientists believe that more than 43 million tons of dust falls over the U.S. every year. Indoor air usually contains about twice as much dust as the air outside. That’s a million microscopic particles in a cubic inch of air. About 2,000 dust mites can live happily on one ounce of carpet dust.
  7. Wall-to-wall carpeting is less healthy than smaller rugs because wall-to-wall carpets tend to be more permanent and harder-to-clean endpoints for moisture, chemicals, liquids, crumbs, and other spills that provide molds, mildew, yeasts, and bacteria (such as e-coli) with a rich and nearly continuous supply of nutrients.
  8. Naphthalene is commonly found in carpet cleaners. In concentrated form, it is dangerous to breath and can cause headaches, nausea, vomiting, and urinary irritation. It is a suspected carcinogen and can be toxic to children, infants, and pets.
  9. In an ABC News investigation, a black light illuminated traces of urine not only on hotel walls, bedspreads, and bathroom vanity stools, but also on the carpeting. In every room they tested, from rooms priced at $55 a night to $400 a night, lab results showed traces of urine or semen in every room. Additionally, hotel rooms that allow pets may harbor fleas or animal urine in the carpet.
  10. Some modern carpets are made from artificial plastic fiber, but other carpets are made from knotted wool, which can house beetle grubs or “woolly bears.” Special chemicals in their stomachs convert wool into sugar so they will munch through carpet like cotton candy.


  1. To make a carpet brighter, sprinkle salt onto the carpet and let it stand for an hour before vacuuming it up. Salt is also effective in removing muddy footprints.
  2. In the Middle Ages, floors were covered with rushes, which acted like a disposable carpet. If it got dirty, it was thrown away. Today, carpets are more permanent and vacuums often miss much of the dirt—and the germs.bCarpet near a fireplace can get very warm, making it a perfect place for an odd little creature called a “firebrat.” It has a long, flexible body and is able to eat almost anything.p
  3. The caterpillar of the palm flower moth is fond of making its home in a deep cavity in a carpet. Regardless of whether the carpet fibers are natural or man-made, the caterpillar will use the fibers to make a cocoon.
  4. Studies at Anderson Labs, international experts report that mice have dropped dead after breathing some new carpet fumes.
  5. Kawasaki Syndrome (named after a Japanese physician who first diagnosed it in the 1960s) is a rare illness that some scientists suggest may be triggered by the toxic chemicals in carpet cleaners. Actor John Travolta and wife Kelly Preston blame exposure to carpet cleaners for their son’s disability and ultimate death. Currently, evidence for a causal link between the disorder and carpet cleaning is inconclusive. 
  6. Dust mites thrive in warm, humid environments, eating dead skin cells and nesting in dust-collecting carpet. The residue that mites leave behind can mix with dust and become airborne, which may cause allergies.
  7. All carpet should be professionally cleaned a minimum of every 12 to 18 months.
  8. The popular song “Magic Carpet Ride” by the Canadian band Steppenwolf peaked at #3 in the US and became the band’s second hit, behind “Born to Be Wild.” It has been interpreted as describing an acid trip or as representing the hippy movement of the late 1960s.oCarcinogens in cigarettes may accumulate in household carpet. Because dogs and cats, not to mention children and infants, spend a great deal of time on the floor, they may be at risk for developing lung cancer in households with cigarette smokers.
  9. New carpets can be a source of chemical emissions. Customers should ask retailers about selecting lower-emitting carpet adhesive or about airing out the carpet before it is installed.
  10. When properly cleaned and maintained, carpeting may improve the quality of air through trapping allergy-inducing dust and allergens. Most people, however, do not clean their carpets correctly, which can actually exacerbate allergies.
  11. Carpets are highly effective places for mature fleas to live because fleas thrive in the carpet’s dry temperature. Conversely, flea eggs love wetter carpet that may be damp due to flooding, inadequate bathroom ventilation, or kitchen-generated moisture. Fleas can bite both people and animals.
  12. The vacuum cleaner is based on Edmund Heming’s 1699 invention of a street-sweeping machine.
  13. When Melville Bissell invented the carpet sweeper, “Bisselling” (rather than “vacuuming”) carpets became a popular term.
  14. Vacuum cleaners in the early 20th century were large, powered by coal, and required three people to operate them. Other early vacuums cleaners had to be parked outside a building and had long hoses that went through the windows. Yet another early version of the vacuum was installed in the house cellar and connected to a network of pipes that led to each room in the house.
  15. Early Hoover vacuum cleaners were hard to sell because potential customers refused to believe (and were even insulted by the suggestion) that they could have that much dirt in their carpets.
  16. Club soda is effective in getting up fresh stains in carpet. Just pour some on the spot, let it set for a few seconds, and then sponge it up.
  17. To remove candle wax from a carpet, place a brown paper bag over the spot and put a hot iron over it. The wax will be absorbed into the bag.
  18. To remove red wine from a carpet, scrub the stain with club soda or cover the stain with salt to let it absorb the wine. Vacuum the residue. If the stain remains, wipe with a solution of detergent, water, and a few drops of white vinegar.
  19. Red carpets traditionally marked the ceremonial and formal routes of leaders and politicians. The first reference to a “red carpet” is Agamemnon (458 B.C.) by Aeschylus.
  20. One family kept falling ill with gastrointestinal problems because a leaky vacuum cleaner kept redepositing Salmonella germs from the carpet into the household air. 
  21. To remove gum from carpet, try pressing ice cubes against the gum until it becomes brittle and breaks off. Then use a spot remover to get rid of the remnants.
  22. Carpets in particular can become heavily infested with mites. The chemical benzyl benzoate will kill mites, but their dead carcasses can still be allergenic and will need to be vacuumed up afterward. A diluted solution of tannic acid can be sprayed onto the carpet to kill dust mites, but tannic acid can be dangerous to humans.
  23. Stachybotrys chartarum is a house mold that grows on wet carpeting. It produces mycotoxins which causes dermatitis, mucosal irritation, and immunosuppression.
  24. To raise depressions in the carpet left by heavy furniture, hold a steam iron close enough for steam to reach the carpet, but don’t let the iron touch the carpet. Lift fibers by scraping them with edge of a coin or spoon.
  1. The American floor covering industry argues that the difference between a “rug” (related to the words “rag” and rough”) and a “carpet” is strictly a matter of size. Any piece smaller than 40 square feet is considered a rug while anything larger is a carpet. According to the American carpet industry, then, the “flying carpet” or “magic carpet” is technically a rug.
  2. Muslim prayer carpets are often woven with motifs such as a mosque lamp (symbolic of Allah), the water basin (symbolic of ritual ablution), a stylized mountain (to symbolically elevate the worshipper), or even the sacred stone, the Kaaba in Mecca.
  3. Although it is not known when the first carpets were produced, they were most likely being made centuries before Christ, probably by nomads in the heart of Central Asia as an attempt to insulate their tents. Over the centuries, carpet weaving was carried across Asia and into the Middle East by invading armies, traders, and migrating nomads.
  4. The floral designs known as palmettes on oriental carpets are mostly derived from the lotus or peony. In regions of the world where water was a precious commodity, it is perhaps not surprising that flowers and fauna were the symbol of paradise.
  5. Oriental carpets are usually rich with symbolism. For example, large Persian carpets often present a small-scale plan of a part of the universe: Heaven above, with Earth below. Carpets also featured an “X,” or an eight-petaled flower, which represents the Four Directions (and, by extension, the World itself). Other symbols include a sky door leading to Heaven and combs, which served as a remainder that Allah demands high standards of cleanliness.
  6. The borders of some oriental carpets were seen to protect those sitting within its magic confines.
  7. Oriental carpets first became highly prized possessions in Europe during the Middle Ages when the crusaders likely returned home with them. The influence was very unilateral, with Europe hardly influencing the design of Oriental carpets.
  8. Some common carpet motifs include various medallions (heraldic qualities and amulets), Boteh (a paisley pattern named after a Persian village), Herati (fish in the pond), a tree of life (a symbol predating both Islam and Christianity representing the connection between this world and paradise), stars, “shou and fu” (symbolizing long life and good luck), animals, birds, plants, and cloud bands.


                                  HELPFUL San Ramon CARPET CLEANING INFORMATION AND TIPS

Carpet cleaning, for beautification, and the removal of stains, dirt, grit, sand, and allergens can be achieved by several methods, both traditional and modern. Clean carpets are recognized by manufacturers as being more visually pleasing, potentially longer-lasting, and probably healthier than poorly maintained carpets. Sanitary Maintenance magazine reports that carpet cleaning is widely misunderstood, and chemical developers have only within recent decades created new carpet-care technologies. Particularly, encapsulation and other green technologies work better, are easier to use, require less training, save more time and money, and lead to less resoiling than prior methods.

Within the USA, the professional carpet-cleaning industry is primarily educated and unofficially governed by The Clean Trust, formerly the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning, and Restoration Certification (IICRC). It is a nonprofit certifying body for the specialized fabric-cleaning industry that sets modern carpet-cleaning standards. It accepts five basic dry and wet professional cleaning methodologies.

hot water extraction vs steam cleaning

Although there is an industrial cleaning process that is in fact steam cleaning, in the context of carpet cleaning, "steam cleaning" is usually a misnomer for or mischaracterization of the hot water extraction cleaning method. The hot water extraction cleaning method uses equipment that sprays heated water (not steam), sometimes with added cleaning chemicals, on the carpet while simultaneously vacuuming the sprayed water along with any dislodged and dissolved dirt. Unlike hard flooring, carpet acts as an air filter. Many carpet manufacturers recommend professional hot water extraction as the most effective carpet cleaning method. Actual steam could damage manmade carpet fibers or shrink natural fibers such as wool.

The primary advantage of the hot water extraction cleaning method is that effective cleaning is possible using only hot water, or hot water with very dilute detergent solutions. This avoids the problems associated with detergent residues that can remain in the carpet with other cleaning methods. Detergent residues on carpet fibers can attract dirt from the soles of shoes as people walk on a carpet, causing the carpet to become dirty again soon after cleaning.

Since the use of detergents and other chemicals is minimized or avoided altogether with the hot water extraction cleaning method, this method is advantageous for persons concerned about possible chemical exposure, especially for children crawling or playing on recently-cleaned carpets. This method also minimizes concerns about breathing volatile chemical compounds that might be used in other cleaning methods.

The primary disadvantage of the hot water extraction cleaning method is that 100% of the water used cannot be removed. If poor water extraction is achieved, in conditions of high humidity, mold growth could occur or be exacerbated. This is not usually a problem with high end commercial water extraction equipment. Moisture left in carpets after cleaning will evaporate more quickly with ventilation, heating, air conditioning or dehumidification.

A variety of hot water extraction carpet cleaning equipment is available, with less expensive equipment marketed for purchase or rental by homeowners, and more expensive equipment used by professional carpet cleaners. The more expensive commercial equipment may employ a rotating high pressure spray and extraction disc. This allows the equipment to achieve many spray-extraction cycles independent of the forward or backward motion of the machine.

Hot water extraction carpet cleaning equipment may be a portable unit that plugs into an electrical outlet or a truck mount carpet cleaner requiring long hoses going from the truck or trailer to the room requiring cleaning. Truck mounted equipment is advantageous where electricity is unavailable (e.g. for cleaning premises where the electrical service was terminated when the premises were vacated by a departing tenant.) Truck mount carpet cleaning may be unsuited to premises distant from a driveway or road, hoses may need to pass through windows to reach upper floors of a building. Hoses needed for truck mount and professional portable carpet cleaning may present an inconvenience or tripping hazard to users of hallways, and pets or children can escape through doors that must be left ajar for hoses. Heated or air conditioned air will also escape from buildings when doors are left open for hoses. This could create a significant waste of energy in some climates. While truck mounted carpet cleaning equipment minimizes noise in the room being cleaned, truck mounted carpet cleaning equipment may cause noise and air pollution offensive to neighbors and may violate anti-idling bylaws in some jurisdictions. However truckmounted cleaning is much faster than portable equipment and extra heat and power can give better results and faster drying times.

Pretreatments similar to those in dry-cleaning and "very low moisture" systems are employed, but require a longer dwell time of 15 to 20 minutes, because of lower amounts of carpet agitation. Ideal pretreatments should rinse easily and leave dry, powdery, or crystalline residue that can be flushed without contributing to re-soiling

Dry-cleaning

For more details on this topic, see Dry carpet cleaning.

Many dry carpet-cleaning systems rely on specialized machines; dry carpet-cleaning machines include those manufactured by Brush and Clean, Host Dry, and Whittaker System. These systems are mostly technically "very low moisture" (VLM) systems, relying on dry compounds complemented by application cleaning solutions, and are growing significantly in market share due in part to their very rapid drying time, a significant factor for 24-hour commercial installations. Dry-cleaning and "very low moisture" systems are also often faster and less labor-intensive than wet-extraction systems.

Heavily soiled areas require the application of manual spotting, or of pretreatments, preconditioners, or "traffic-lane cleaners", which are detergents or emulsifiers that break the binding of different soils to carpet fibers over a short period of time, commonly sprayed onto carpet prior to the primary use of the dry-cleaning system. One chemical dissolves the greasy films that bind soils and prevent effective soil removal by vacuuming. The solution may add a solvent like d-limonene, petroleum byproducts, glycol ethers, or butyl agents. The amount of time the pretreatment "dwells" in the carpet should be less than 15 minutes, due to the thorough carpet brushing common to these "very low moisture" systems, which provides added agitation to ensure the pretreatment works fully through the carpet.

Dry compound

A 98% biodegradable absorbent cleaning compound may be spread evenly over carpet and brushed or scrubbed in. For small areas, a household hand brush can work such a compound into carpet pile; dirt and grime is attracted to the compound, which is then vacuumed off, leaving carpet immediately clean and dry. For commercial applications, a specially designed cylindrical counter-rotating brushing system is used, without a vacuum cleaner. Machine scrubbing is more typical, in that hand scrubbing generally cleans only the top third of carpet

Encapsulation

In the 1990s, new polymers began literally encapsulating (crystallizing) soil particles into dry residues on contact, in a process now regarded by the industry as a growing, up-and-coming technology; working like "tiny sponges", the deep-cleaning compound crystals dissolve and absorb dirt prior to its removal from the carpet. Cleaning solution is applied by rotary machine, brush applicator, or compression sprayer. Dry residue is vacuumable immediately, either separately or from a built-in unit of the cleaning-system machine. According to ICS Cleaning Specialist, evidence suggests encapsulation improves carpet appearance, compared to other systems; and it is favorable in terms of high-traffic needs, operator training, equipment expense, and lack of wet residue. Encapsulation also avoids the drying time of carpet shampoos, making the carpet immediately available for use.

The use of encapsulation to create a crystalline residue that can be immediately vacuumed (as opposed to the dry powder residue of wet cleaning systems, which generally requires an additional day before vacuuming) has recently become an accepted method for commercial and residential carpet maintenance

Bonnet

After club soda mixed with cleaning product is deposited onto the surface as mist, a round buffer or "bonnet" scrubs the mixture with rotating motion. This industry machine resembles a floor buffer, with an absorbent spin pad that attracts soil and is rinsed or replaced repeatedly. The bonnet method is not strictly dry-cleaning and involves significant drying time. To reduce pile distortion, the absorbent pad should be kept well-lubricated with cleaning solution.

When there is a large amount of foreign material below the carpet backing, extraction with a wet process may be needed. The spin-bonnet method may not be as capable of sanitizing carpet fibers due to the lack of hot water, but a post-cleaning application of an antimicrobial agent is used to make up for this. Compared to steam cleaning, the small amounts of water required with spin-bonnet carpet cleaning favor water-conservation considerations.

Shampoo

Wet shampoo cleaning with rotary machines, followed by thorough wet vacuuming, was widespread until about the 1970s, but industry perception of shampoo cleaning changed with the advent of encapsulation. Hot-water extraction, also regarded as preferable, had not been introduced either. Wet shampoos were once formulated from coconut oil soaps; wet shampoo residues can be foamy or sticky, and steam cleaning often reveals dirt unextracted by shampoos. Since no rinse is performed, the powerful residue can continue to collect dirt after cleaning, leading to the misconception that carpet cleaning can lead to the carpet getting "dirtier faster" after the cleaning

Before and After Image of Carpet Cleaning

Tea leaves and cut grass were formerly common for floor cleaning, to collect dust from carpets, albeit with risks of stains. Ink was removed with lemon or with oxalic acid and hartshorn; oil with white bread or with pipe clay; grease fats with turpentine; ox gall and naphtha were also general cleaners. Ammonia and chloroform were recommended for acid discoloration. Benzine and alum were suggested for removing insects; diatomaceous earth and material similar to cat litter are still common for removing infestations. Candle wax is removed by placing a towel over the affected carpet area and applying steam from a clothes iron until the wax absorbs into the towel. Some traditional methods of stain removal remain successful and ecological. Caution should be addressed when treating natural fibers such as wool.

The longer the stain material remains in the carpet, the higher the chance of permanent color change, even if all the original stain material is removed. Immediately blotting (not rubbing) the stain material as soon as possible will help reduce the chances of permanent color change. Artificial food coloring stains are generally considered permanent stains (Kool-Aid, Gatorade, Listerine, soda, etc.). These may be removed by professional cleaners or deep cleaning rental machines with heat-transfer stain-reducing chemicals, but carry risks of burning the carpet. Stain removal products can be combined with anti-allergen treatments to kill house dust mites.


 

Other

Carpet rods, rattan rugbeaters, and carpet-beating machines for beating out dust, and also brooms, brushes, dustpans, and shaking and hanging were all carpet-cleaning methods of the 19th century; brooms particularly carry risks of wear. Steam Cleaning increases the lifespan of your carpet.

Misconceptions

Robert Wittkamp (1942–2007), IICRC-certified master Carpet Cleaners technician with 30 years' expertise in carpet cleaning, commented that old wives' tales persist and thrive within the industry. For instance, the concept that walking barefoot on a carpet may lead to damage from body oils has not been supported or disproven by standardized reports or testing or by industry evidence.




 CARPET CLEANERS AND FABRIC CLEANING FOR San Ramon, SAN RAMON, DUBLIN, PLEASANTON, UNION CITY, HAYWARD, FREMONT,LIVERMORE, and ALAMO , CA